THE PORTER-PHELPS-HUNTINGTON MUSEUM TO HOST COMMUNITY DAY FOR BELCHERTOWN, SOUTH HADLEY, GRANBY JUNE 15TH, 2019

PORTER-PHELPS-HUNTINGTON FOUNDATION, INC.

130 RIVER DRIVE HADLEY MA 01035

HADLEY, MA—The Porter-Phelps-Huntington-Museum invites all residents of Belchertown, South Hadley, and Granby to a Community Day on Saturday, June 15th, 2019 from 10:00am to 3:30pm. All residents are welcome to the Museum for free tours on the half hour. Afterwards, guests can relax on the back veranda with complimentary lemonade and cookies. Members of the community are encouraged to explore the homestead and grounds of one of the founding families of Hadley, and learn about the history of the Connecticut River Valley.  

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum provides a detailed look at the role of one family in the span of over 200 years of history in the Connecticut Valley. The home, built in 1752, is preserved to its circa 1800 structure and interior décor. During a tour of the house, visitors witness the impact of historical events like the Revolutionary War, the abolition of slavery, learn more about the changing role of women, and the impact of various theological movements on local society. A visit to the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House allows guests to experience the evolution of a nation as seen through the eyes of one local family.  

This summer, Belchertown native, Belchertown High School alumna, and Smith College student Lily Stowe-Alekman will be working as a Museum Assistant. As a history major and archives concentrator focused on American and women’s history, Stowe-Alekman is especially interested by the stories of the women in the family, slavery and indentured servitude on the homestead, and the transformation of the house into a museum. “Working in a historical site everyday is an incredibly powerful and transformative experience,” Stowe-Alekman states. As a local, connecting with the history of the Connecticut River Valley has been especially important. As is tradition for Museum Assistants at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum, Stowe-Alekman has written her own tour based on her interests as a history major. She hopes to see many familiar faces at this Community Day!

Today, the house is not only host to historical interpretation, but also to weekly concerts and teas. Wednesday evenings from June 12th through July 24th, the Museum presents Wednesday Folk Traditions, an annual concert series featuring talented musicians working in a vast array of traditions, cultures, genres, and sounds, ranging from traditional American folk singers to diverse international ensembles. Every Saturday afternoon in July through August, the Museum hosts “A Perfect Spot of Tea,” where guests are invited to relax on the back porch, sample desserts and tea from local restaurants and bakeries, and listen to talented local musicians.  Visitors are also encouraged to walk the hiking trails that circle a portion of this 1752 farm and include 350 acres of preserved land. A part of the Connecticut River Scenic Byway Project, these trails cover Porter-Phelps-Huntington property, move along the scenic Connecticut River, and extend to Hadley’s Mount Warner.

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum is located at 130 River Drive (Route 47) in Hadley, two miles north of the junction of Routes 9 and 47 North. The Museum is open for guided tours Saturday through Wednesday from 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. For further information about tours or other programs, please call the Museum at (413) 584-4699 or visit our website at http://www.pphmuseum.org .

THE PORTER-PHELPS-HUNTINGTON MUSEUM TO HOST COMMUNITY DAY FOR NORTHAMPTON, HATFIELD, AND WHATELY JUNE 9TH, 2019

PORTER-PHELPS-HUNTINGTON FOUNDATION, INC.

130 RIVER DRIVE HADLEY MA 01035

HADLEY, MA—The Porter-Phelps-Huntington-Museum invites all residents of Northampton, Hatfield, and Whately to a Community Day on Sunday, June 9th, 2019 from 10:00am to 3:30pm. All residents are welcome to the Museum for free tours on the half hour. Afterwards, guests can relax on the back veranda with complimentary lemonade and cookies. Members of the community are encouraged to explore the homestead and grounds of one of the founding families of Hadley, and learn about the history of the Connecticut River Valley.  

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum provides a detailed look at the role of one family in the span of over 200 years of history in the Connecticut Valley. The home, built in 1752, is preserved to its circa 1800 structure and interior décor. During a tour of the house, visitors witness the impact of historical events like the Revolutionary War, the abolition of slavery, learn more about the changing role of women, and the impact of various theological movements on local society. A visit to the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House allows guests to experience the evolution of a nation as seen through the eyes of one local family.  

This summer, three Smith College students are interning at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum as Museum Assistants. Lily Stowe-Alekman hails from Belchertown, Massachusetts and is a rising sophomore at Smith College where she majors in history and is a member of the Archives Concentration program. Veronica Douglas is originally from Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and is a history major, archives concentrator, and a rising junior. Caroline Smith is from Santa Cruz, California, and is a history major and rising junior. All three are very excited to continue to immerse themselves in the history of Hadley, Western Massachusetts, and the Connecticut River Valley and hope you’ll join them at the Museum for Community Day!

Today, the house is not only host to historical interpretation, but also to weekly concerts and teas. Wednesday evenings from June 12th through July 24th, the Museum presents Wednesday Folk Traditions, an annual concert series featuring talented musicians working in a vast array of traditions, cultures, genres, and sounds, ranging from traditional American folk singers to diverse international ensembles. Every Saturday afternoon in July through August, the Museum hosts “A Perfect Spot of Tea,” where guests are invited to relax on the back porch, sample desserts and tea from local restaurants and bakeries, and listen to talented local musicians.  

Visitors are also encouraged to walk the hiking trails that circle a portion of this 1752 farm and include 350 acres of preserved land. A part of the Connecticut River Scenic Byway Project, these trails cover Porter-Phelps-Huntington property, move along the scenic Connecticut River, and extend to Hadley’s Mount Warner.

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum is located at 130 River Drive (Route 47) in Hadley, two miles north of the junction of Routes 9 and 47 North. For further information about the Museum and its programs, visit www.pphmuseum.org or call the Museum at (413) 584-4699.

THE PORTER-PHELPS-HUNTINGTON MUSEUM TO HOST COMMUNITY DAY FOR AMHERST, HADLEY, AND SUNDERLAND JUNE 8TH, 2019

PORTER-PHELPS-HUNTINGTON FOUNDATION, INC.

130 RIVER DRIVE HADLEY MA 01035

HADLEY, MA—The Porter-Phelps-Huntington-Museum invites all residents of Amherst, Hadley, and Sunderland to a Community Day on Saturday, June 8th, 2019 from 10:00am to 3:30pm. All residents are welcome to the Museum for free tours on the half hour. Afterwards, guests can relax on the back veranda with complimentary lemonade and cookies. Members of the community are encouraged to explore the homestead and grounds of one of the founding families of Hadley, and learn about the history of the Connecticut River Valley.  

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum provides a detailed look at the role of one family in the span of over 200 years of history in the Connecticut Valley. The home, built in 1752, is preserved to its circa 1800 structure and interior décor. During a tour of the house, visitors witness the impact of historical events like the Revolutionary War, the abolition of slavery, learn more about the changing role of women, and the impact of various theological movements on local society. A visit to the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House allows guests to experience the evolution of a nation as seen through the eyes of one local family.  

Today, the house is not only host to historical interpretation, but also to weekly concerts and teas. Wednesday evenings from June 12th through July 24th, the Museum presents Wednesday Folk Traditions, an annual concert series featuring talented musicians working in a vast array of traditions, cultures, genres, and sounds, ranging from traditional American folk singers to diverse international ensembles. Every Saturday afternoon in July through August, the Museum hosts “A Perfect Spot of Tea,” where guests are invited to relax on the back porch, sample desserts and tea from local restaurants and bakeries, and listen to talented local musicians. Visitors are also encouraged to walk the hiking trails that circle a portion of this 1752 farm and include 350 acres of preserved land. A part of the Connecticut River Scenic Byway Project, these trails cover Porter-Phelps-Huntington property, move along the scenic Connecticut River, and extend to Hadley’s Mount Warner.

This summer, Amherst College senior and Amherst native Anna Plummer is a Museum Assistant at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum and conducting tours. She says,“After a little more than a week here, I feel more connected to the history of the Pioneer Valley than I ever have. This house, property, and its unique collections tell the story of a highly connected family over almost three centuries, but also provide unique insight into the lives of the women of the house and some of the many free, indentured and enslaved laborers the family farm depended on.” With several years of experience as a tour guide at the beloved Emily Dickinson Museum and interests in English literature, poetry writing, and the performing arts, Anna looks forward to deepening her understanding of  historic house museum operations, pursuing independent research, and undoubtedly writing some poetry about it all. She hopes to see familiar faces stop by at this Community Day.

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum is located at 130 River Drive (Route 47) in Hadley, two miles north of the junction of Routes 9 and 47 North. For further information about the Museum and its programs, visit www.pphmuseum.org or call the Museum at (413) 584-4699.

Meet Our Summer 2019 Museum Assistants: Anna

My name is Anna Plummer and I am a Museum Assistant at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum this summer! I joined the team a little later after a semester studying in England. I am a rising senior at Amherst College, where I am a Theater & Dance and English double major, with a special interest in poetry and 19th-century literature in its historic context. 

As an Amherst native with several years of experience as a tour guide at the Emily Dickinson Museum, I am excited to engage with new and intersecting perspectives on life in the Pioneer Valley over the years. I am also interested in the literary connections of this influential Hadley family.

I will be giving tours for the public, assisting at our summer events including Wednesday Folk Traditions and Perfect Spot of Tea, and conducting independent research. 

It is difficult to choose one favorite room, but I find the attic a particularly special feature of the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum. While one of the more bare spaces and susceptible to the extremes of New England weather, it provides a unique opportunity to imagine the harsher lives of the servants, laborers, and slaves of the family that possibly lived there. It’s hidden high up and far back in the home and, curiously, also houses a meat smoker. 

When I am not at the museum I am likely singing or dancing in some form, enjoying the woods behind my home, or writing poetry. Stop by to explore and discuss this incredible local historic resource with me!

Anna house.jpg

Meet Our Summer 2019 Museum Assistants: Lily

My name is Lily Stowe-Alekman and I am a Museum Assistant at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum this summer! I am a rising sophomore at Smith College, where I am in majoring in history and concentrating in archives with a specific interest in American history and women’s history. I grew up in nearby Belchertown, MA and I love being in the Pioneer Valley. I’m excited to share local history with visitors from the area and far away this summer.

I will be giving tours this summer and helping at events, such as Wednesday Folk Traditions and a Perfect Spot of Tea. I look forward to bringing my experience as a tour guide at Smith College and as a volunteer at the Smith College Museum of Art to my work at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum. As an archives concentrator and history major, I am also very excited to work in the museum’s special collections and do some research over the summer.

My favorite room in the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House Museum is the kitchen. I think that one can gain a sense of how busy and productive the house once was as a farm from this room. I think it is also important to highlight those whose stories are not often included in the family narrative (i.e. the servants and enslaved people who labored in the house). I’m especially interested in the kitchen tools, because you can see how labor intensive this work must have been.

When I’m not at the museum, you can find me spending time with my family, friends, and my miniature dachshunds, Rosie and Jedi. I am so excited to spend my summer here at home in the beautiful Pioneer Valley and can’t wait to show you all the museum has to offer!

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Meet Our Summer 2019 Museum Assistants: Veronica

My name is Veronica Douglas, and I’m a rising junior at Smith College, where I’m a history major and archives concentrator. I’m looking forward to spending my summer working as a museum assistant at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum and living in Amherst.

I’m originally from North Carolina, and I’m excited to bring my experience as a docent at the Burwell School Historic Site to PPH. In addition to giving tours and assisting with our summer programming, I will be conducting independent research at the house. My academic interests include women’s history, labor history, and material culture and I look forward to exploring these subjects this summer.

My favorite room in the house is the south parlor, aka “The Long Room.” You can tell it used to be hopping back in the day, with the family hosting teas, game nights, and weddings. I especially love the toys in the closet because they reveal what life was like for the six generations of children here.

When I’m not at the museum, you can find me hiking, baking, and exploring the Pioneer Valley. I look forward to showing you all the museum has to offer.



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Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum to Co-Host Opening Day Event with Kestrel Land Trust

Porter-Phelps-Huntington Foundation, Inc.

130 River Drive Hadley MA  01035

Opening weekend, Saturday, May 18th, a joint program with Kestrel Trust, Birding & History at Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum will take place from 8 am – 11:30 am to celebrate both our Valley’s natural and cultural heritage and the Museum’s 70th anniversary. Moses Porter acquired 600 acres of land along the Connecticut River up to Mount Warner in North Hadley in 1752 to build the farmstead known as Forty Acres. The house sits in the Forty Acre Meadow along the Connecticut River two miles north of the Hadley Common.  The house, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is surrounded by over 350 acres of protected farmland, forest, and river frontage—including Kestrel’s Dyer Conservation Area donated by Elizabeth Huntington Dyer to the Nature Conservancy. The PPH Museum is also the Visitor Center for the National Connecticut River Scenic Byway. The cost for this special program is $15 per person. Registration is required. Contact Kestrel Trust to Register: https://www.kestreltrust.org/calendar/birding-history-pph-2019.

Dedicated Volunteer Felicia Fil Wins Young Community Leader Award

Congratulations to our dedicate volunteer Felicia Fil on winning the Young Community Leader Award. Per the Hampshire Gazette, “To earn the Gold Award, Fil had to do 80 hours of service but ended up doing 300, which included being a volunteer waiter at summer events at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House and training new museum staff for the Perfect Spot of Tea, as well as visiting residents at The Arbors retirement community in Amherst. Previously, when earning the Silver Award, Fil completed 50 hours of service, during which time she sewed pillowcases for patients at Shriners Hospitals for Children.”

Read the full article here.

To volunteer with the Museum please email pphmuseumassistant@gmail.com or call 413-584-4699

PORTER-PHELPS-HUNTINGTON MUSEUM OPENS FOR 2019 SEASON May 18th for its 70th season

Porter-Phelps-Huntington Foundation, Inc.

130 River Drive Hadley MA  01035

HADLEY – The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum, an historic house museum dating to 1752 in Hadley Massachusetts opens Saturday, May 18, 2019 for its 70th season. Guided tours will be available Saturday through Wednesday from 1:00 to 4:30 pm. The museum is closed on Thursdays and Fridays. Admission is $5 for adults and $1 for children.

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington House, known as Forty Acres, is an 18th-century farm on the banks of the Connecticut River that today interprets life in rural New England over three centuries.  Through the words, spaces and possessions of the women and men who lived here, the Museum portrays the activities of a prosperous and productive 18th-century farmstead. Members of this household along with numerous artisans, servants and slaves made "Forty Acres" an important social and commercial link in local, regional and national cultural and economic networks.  Through the 19th century the generations transformed the estate into a rural retreat. In the 20th-century the house was preserved as a museum by family members and now contains the possessions of six generations of this extended family.  

The rooms in the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum remain as they were arranged by members of the family to accommodate the procession of relatives, neighbors, community leaders and workers who crossed the house’s threshold.  From farmers and businessmen, to religious leaders and social workers, to servants and slaves, the stories of many men, women, and children spanning 250 years of American History are told  within the house. The Porter-Phelps-Huntington   House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. 

Opening weekend, Saturday, May 18th a joint program with Kestrel Trust, Birding & History at Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum will take place from 8 am – 11:30 am to celebrate both our Valley’s natural and cultural heritage and the Museum’s 70th anniversary. Moses Porter acquired 600 acres of land along the Connecticut River up to Mount Warner in North Hadley in 1752 to build the farmstead known as Forty Acres. The house sits in the Forty Acre Meadow along the Connecticut River two miles north of the Hadley Common.  The house, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is surrounded by over 350 acres of protected farmland, forest, and river frontage—including Kestrel’s Dyer Conservation Area donated by Elizabeth Huntington Dyer to the Nature Conservancy. The PPH Museum is also the Visitor Center for the National Connecticut River Scenic Byway. The cost for this special program is $15 per person. Registration is required. Contact Kestrel Trust to Register: https://www.kestreltrust.org/calendar/birding-history-pph-2019.

Programs this summer include the thirty-eighth season of WEDNESDAY FOLK TRADITIONS, featuring some of New England's finest ethnic folk music performers and ensembles. Performances will be held Wednesday evenings at 6:30 P.M starting June 12 with Grammy nominated composer Evelyn Harris, powerhouse vocalist, former member of Sweet Honey In The Rock, whose remarkable vocal instrument creates stirring interpretations of the traditional African-American song cannon including spirituals, freedom songs, jazz, pop, rock 'n' roll, gospel and blues in our 9th Annual Horace Clarence Boyer Gospel Concert.  The WFT series continues with weekly performances through July 24.   

"A PERFECT SPOT OF TEA" will be held each Saturday in July and August with seatings at 2:30 P.M. and 3:30 P.M. on the museum's back veranda.  Local musicians will perform while guests sip Earl Grey tea and taste pastries donated by local restaurants. 

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum is also the Way-Point Center for the National Connecticut River Scenic Byway. The Museum hosts a panel exhibit on the natural history of the Valley, the Museum’s history, and sites along the by-way for travelers. A newly created trail system begins at the Museum, traverses the farm fields along the river and continues along the old buggy path to the top of Mount Warner where the family grazed their cattle in the 18th century.

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum is located at 130 River Drive, Hadley MA on Route 47 just two miles north of the junction of Routes 9 and 47 North in Hadley.  For information concerning tours or special events, phone (413) 584-4699 or check the museum web site: www.pphmuseum.org .

LISTING:

Porter-Phelps-Huntington House Museum, Hadley

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington House was built in 1752 by Moses and Elizabeth Porter and was central to the 600-acre farmstead known as “Forty Acres.”  Today, the property is surrounded by over 350 acres of protected farmland, forest and river frontage.  The Museum portrays the activities of a wealthy and productive 18th-century household including numerous artisans, servants and slaves who made "Forty Acres" an important social and commercial link in local, regional and national cultural and economic networks.  Since 1799 there have been no structural changes to the house. In the 19th century the house evolved into a rural retreat for family and in the mid 20th century became an early example of historic preservation.  The museum is listed on the National Historic Register and contains a collection of the belongings of seven generations of one extended Hadley family. Open May 18 through October 15, Saturday through Wednesday. The Museum also presents a series of special programs including Wednesday Folk Traditions concerts and Saturday teas. 

For more information: www.pphmuseum.org ▪ 130 River Drive (Route 47) ▪ (413) 584-4699

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Porter-Phelps-Huntington Member Letter May 2019

Porter-Phelps-Huntington Foundation, Inc.

130 River Drive   Hadley MA 01035 

May 2019

Dear Family and Friends of the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum,

The daffodils are barely out and so you may think it too early to plan your summer – but we want to get on your calendar!  Please look at the Wednesday Folk Traditions brochure for the June and July concerts at the Museum and post it on your fridge for easy reference.

You have supported these programs in past years, and we hope you will do so again this year.

I enjoy these concerts because they encourage me to listen to voices I don't hear very often.  I live in a city where hardly anyone is like me, and I work with people whose backgrounds are very different from mine.  Occasionally we talk of important things, things we need to know about each other if we are to live together respectfully.  Music is the way we say things that words cannot.  It is visceral; it touches those important things that polite society doesn’t handle very well.

With singer Evelyn Harris we hear the story of the African-American struggle and liberation.  With Fusion Nomads we hear the yearning of the young for world peace.  With “Songs of My Family” we hear the singer searching for her identity.

Wednesday Folk Traditions concerts encourage me to add my voice to the mix.  I know identity politics gets a bad rap, but people secure in their heritage do not fear the beautiful voices of others who are secure in theirs.  Rather we are enriched and enlarged.  You can hear that from the Wednesday Folk Traditions performers.  They have social and community goals as well as personal and artistic ones. 

So put Wednesday Folk Traditions at the Huntington House on your calendar for a summer evening’s concert and bring the kids!  You may even want to talk with them about why you support these programs with your financial contribution.  You and your family’s loyalty to the Museum is important to us, and we look forward to seeing you this summer.

Thank you,

 

Elizabeth H. Wheeler

Board of Directors

www.pphmuseum.org

PPH Year end Member Letter December 2018. Thank you for your contributions.

Porter-Phelps-Huntington Foundation, Inc.

130 River Drive Hadley MA 01035

December 2018

Dear Friends and Family of the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum,

When we get old it dawns on us how strange and utterly unique our lives have been, how vividly our favorite things encapsulate our times and exhibit who we are. Each of us deserves a museum. Like the Huntington House but maybe a little more zany.

When James Lincoln Huntington turned the Huntington House into a museum in 1955 he preserved what he thought were the best of its furnishings and objects to tell the story of a whole family. And indeed when you walk through the house you can feel the aura of the ancestors. But their personalities are a bit misty. What we’re lacking are the things Jimmy Huntington discarded, which is not surprising because none were of museum quality. He might even have thought of them as detritus.

But something was lost. If he could have preserved a “cabinet of curiosities” for individual family members, they would have come more clearly into focus and come alive for us.”

Think about your own personal museum. What would you put in it? How would you curate your life? I see in my place an upside down snathe, a silver baby spoon, a pink pussy cap from the 2017 Women’s March, a piece of Manhattan schist, a small lucite pillar commemorating the opening day of Hampshire College, a Ralph Waldo Emerson monograph, an African fertility doll, an Eastern Orthodox icon, a chenille stole, a pork-pie hat with a stained sweat band, a pewter hip flask with my name on it. You get the idea.

This particular collection is unique to me. No one else could have imagined it, let alone want to replicate it. It’s eccentric, a little weird but wonderful too. It has personality. The place would be anonymous without these things. The Huntington House is fortunate in having extensive archives at Amherst College that flesh out the individuals who lived here. We know, for instance, that “nothing was as slippery as money” in the hands of Dan and Elizabeth Huntington’s eldest daughter and that her father’s “army of jokes” embarrassed her. But we have none of her favorite things, a toy, a scarf, a spoon. Our glimpses of her would have been fuller had we also been able to see the things she chose to be her daily companions.

I hope that as future family donations come to the Museum each donor will include a “cabinet of curiosities” of his or her favorite things. And I hope too that you will collect your own treasures for the fun of it, just to see what comes up. Meanwhile thank you for your support of the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum and for your interest in these questions. And if you do create your own “cabinet of curiosities,” perhaps you would share its contents with us.

Cordially,

Elizabeth H. Wheeler,

Board of Directors

www.pphmuseum.org




"Crossing the Heretic's Bridge", a Presentation by Ken Samonds

Crossing the Heretic's Bridge" by Ken Samonds
Wednesday, September 26 at 7:00 PM
At Grace Church on 14 Boltwood Ave, Amherst, MA 01002

To those interested in learning more about the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Family, you’re invited to a presentation about Frederick Dan Huntington titled, “Crossing the Heretic’s Bridge”. Ken Samonds will be presenting to the Grace Episcopal Church on Wednesday, September 26, at 7:00 PM.

The title of the talk refers to a life changing incident that influenced his life-choices, career, and his faith at the age of eight. Frederick Dan Huntington is known as one of the founders of the Grace Church and some may remember that he was the donor of the east window. Only a few may know of other details of his national reputation or of his life-journey from a farm in Hadley to St. Paul's Cathedral, Syracuse, New York.

We encourage anyone that is interested in the history of Hadley or the Grace Episcopal Church to come and enjoy this talk by Ken Samonds!

THE PORTER-PHELPS-HUNTINGTON MUSEUM ANNOUNCES NEW SCHEDULE FOR THE 2018 FALL SEASON

HADLEY—The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum will be open  for guided tours Saturdays, Sundays, and Mondays from 1:00 – 4:00 PM and closed Tuesday through Friday until the end of its 2018 season,  October 15th.

 

The Museum has three programs scheduled for Sundays in September:

 

September 16, 2018-  An Artists’ Reception, 2-4 pm, for FIELD NOTES 8, an exhibition of colorful mobile compositions, and wood bas reliefs created by architects Sigrid Miller Pollin and Stephen Schreiber, and landscape architect Jane Thurber.

https://www.pphmuseum.org/field-notes-8-2018

 

September 23, 2018-  At 2 pm, the New England Mandolin Orchestra will premiere what it believes to be the first mandolin rendition of Wolfgang Mozart's Quartet #17, nicknamed "The Hunt," one of six string quartets he composed and dedicated to his friend and hero Franz Joseph Haydn, and a  mandolin interpretation of a violin concerto by Johann Sebastian Bach. Admission is by donation and will be held in the Museum’s Corn Barn.

https://www.pphmuseum.org/mandolin-new-england/

 

September 30, 2018-  At 3 pm, Grammy nominated Senegalese Master Kora player Youssoupha Sidibe performs ancient African Harp styles blended with Sufi devotional chanting and western music creating a unique musical expression that he has shared around the world. Admission is $12 for adults and $2 for children 12 and under.  The concert will be held at the Museum rain or shine. This program is the final performance in the museum’s WFT series. https://www.pphmuseum.org/2018-youssoupha-sidibe

 

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum is located at 130 River Drive (Route 47) in Hadley, two miles north of the junction of Routes 9 and 47. The Museum is open for guided tours Saturday through Monday from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. The house, which remains unchanged since the family’s occupancy, tells the story of six generations of prominent Hadley residents. The family, prosperous traders turned farmers, fought in both the Seven Years’ War and Revolutionary War, rose to prominence in local government, and embodied a consistently progressive social consciousness. Tours highlight both local and regional narratives, ranging in focus from architecture, material culture, and labor, to early American theology, economics, and social movements. The Museum is open for guided tours Saturday through Wednesday from 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. and by appointment. Tours are $5 for adults, $1 for children under twelve. For further information about tours or other programs, please call the Museum at (413) 584-4699 or visit us online at pphmuseum.org.

THE PORTER-PHELPS-HUNTINGTON MUSEUM PRESENTS AN ARTIST RECEPTION FOR “FIELD NOTES 8” BY SIGRID MILLER POLLIN, STEPHEN SCHREIBER, AND JANE THURBER SEPTEMBER 16, 2018, 2-4 PM

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On September 16th, 2018, The Porter-Phelps Huntington Museum will host an artist reception from 2-4 pm for Field Notes 8, a new installation of suspended collage and wooden bas reliefs created by architects Sigrid Miller Pollin and Stephen Schreiber, and landscape architects Jane Thurber. Guests will be able to meet the artists and view the installation which reflects rhythms found in the landscape and structures of Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum. The exhibit will be on display through October 15, 2018 in the museum’s historic Corn Barn.

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Amherst-based artists Miller Pollin, Thurber, and Schreiber found inspiration in the details of the historic structures and farmland at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum. Schreiber’s bas reliefs interpret the subtle, repetitive weaving of the surrounding fields and riverbanks, while Thurber and Miller Pollin’s suspended collage of shapes and colors creates a whimsical dialogue with the tectonics and the seasoned materials of the Corn Barn. Layers of painted paper strips suspended from the wooden trusses take inspiration from architectural details and patterns found in the Corn Barn. Together, the artists have composed a modern reinterpretation of the historic elements that define the museum and its grounds. Schreiber and Miller Pollin are professors of architecture, and Thurber is a lecturer in landscape architecture, all at Umass. Students Victoria Capaldo and Callie Kerkorian, assisted in the exhibition production.

WEDNESDAY FOLK TRADITIONS CONCERT WITH TIM ERIKSEN RELOCATED TO WESLEY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

Due to weather forecast, the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum will relocate Wednesday Folk Traditions featuring Tim Eriksen to Wesley United Methodist Church at 98 N. Maple Street in Hadley, Massachusetts.

The concert is on August 8, 2018 at 6:30 pm with Tim Eriksen, “widely regarded as the best ballad singer of his generation” (BBC Radio), performing modern interpretations of traditional folk songs from the Pioneer Valley and beyond. Visit the museum’s Facebook page, or call at 413-584-4699 for the most up-to-date information regarding the concert series.

WEDNESDAY FOLK TRADITIONS WITH YOUSSOUPHA SIDIBE RESCHEDULED FOR THE FALL

Due to weather forecast, the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum will reschedule Wednesday Folk Traditions featuring Youssoupha Sidibe to a date TBD in the fall. Wednesday Folk Traditions continues August 8, 2018 at 6:30 pm with Tim Eriksen, “widely regarded as the best ballad singer of his generation” (BBC Radio), performing modern interpretations of traditional folk songs from the Pioneer Valley and beyond. Visit the museum’s website at www.pphmuseum.org, the museum’s Facebook page, or call at 413-584-4699 for the most up-to-date information regarding the concert series.

Wednesday Folk Traditions with Tim Eriksen postponed to August 8, 2018

Due to predicted weather, the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum reschedules its Wednesday Folk Traditions concert featuring Tim Eriksen to WednesdayAugust 8, 2018 at 6:30 pm. Ethnomusicologist, experimentalist, and leader of the “shape-note” tradition, Tim Eriksen performs modern interpretations of traditional folk songs from the Pioneer Valley and beyond. Wednesday Folk Traditions continues on Wednesday, August 1st with Youssoupha Sidibe, a Grammy-nominated Senegalese Master Kora player who breaks with tradition to create a new genre that blends aspects of western music with Reggae, ancient African Harp styles and West African traditional and devotional music.  Visit the museum’s website at www.pphmuseum.org or call at 413-584-4699 for the most up-to-date information regarding the concert series.

Wednesday Folk Traditions presents Jose Gonzalez and Criollo Clasico on July 11

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The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum continues its 37th season of Wednesday Folk Traditions on July 11, 2018, with Jose Gonzalez & Criollo Clasico, performing contemporary rhythms of Puerto Rico, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic. Comprised of Jose Gonzalez, his sons Ahmed, a flute sensation, and multi-percussionist Rene, this family is one of the most prestigious music ensembles of Puerto Rico. This and all other performances are held Wednesday evenings at 6:30 pm in the Sunken Garden at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum, 130 River Drive, Route 47, Hadley, MA  01035.  General admission is $12, or $2 for children 16 and under. Picnickers are welcome on the museum grounds beginning at 5:00 pm. The museum and its grounds a smoke-free site. For further information please call (413)-584-4699 or visit www.pphmuseum.org

Master of the cuatro, the national instrument of Puerto Rico, Jose Gonzalez is renowned as one of Puerto Rico’s premier artists and composers. In the past, he has been music director for Puerto Rico's top artists, such as Giovanni Hidalgo, Danny Rivera, El Topo, Roy Brown. He has performed all over the United States and Puerto Rico, including appearances with the Hartford, CT and Puerto Rico Symphony Orchestras as well as the Bronx Arts Ensemble, New Jersey Chamber Music Society, Heineken Jazz Jam Series and the World Guitar Festival among many others. His composition “Bomba Te Traigo Yo” was performed by the US Navy Band in Washington DC in 2009. Gonzalez has become a favorite performer in the Valley at various colleges and festivals, his music hailed as a “gift to the soul”

Jose Gonzalez will be joined by his two sons, Rene and Ahmed, acclaimed musicians in their own right. Together, they form Criollo Clasico, a group celebrated both in Puerto Rico and the Pioneer Valley. Ahmed Gonzalez, flute, percussion, and guitar, studied classical flute at Smith College under the direction of Sue Kurian, who studied with the great Jean-Pierre Rampal.  His dedication to the jazz flute led him to record and perform with several prominent Latin artists, as well as to produce his 2009 album “Flute Soul” (2009 Criollo Clasico Music). “Flute Soul” features myriad styles, from Latin to Classical to rock, all of which Rene performs with mastery and virtuosity. Rene Gonzalez, percussionist and bassist, studied music at UMass and has performed alongside world masters of percussion such as Giovanni Hidalgo, Paoili Mejias, Trilok Gurtu and Steve Berrios. His skills on congas, bongos, timbales, drumset, cajon, bata drums and his continuous studies make him a living encyclopedia of Latin percussion. Most recently, he has begun apprenticeships on electric and upright bass, performing with numerous groups on these instruments as well. Together, the family forms one of today’s finest performance groups of Puerto Rico.

"A PERFECT SPOT OF TEA" JULY 7TH PRESENTS: WEST AND JACKSON

Afternoon tea with good company, interesting conversation, and lively music has been a tradition at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum for over two hundred and fifty years. On July 7th the museum will host the first event of their summer series “A Perfect Spot of Tea.” Visitors are invited to the museum’s back veranda while enjoying a cup of earl grey tea, delicious pastries, and jazz, pop, and original instrumentals on guitar by Peter West. Admission is $12 per person. Seatings will take place at 2:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. For an additional fee, guests may also tour the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House Museum. Tours will be held hourly on the half hour, beginning at 1:30 pm. For more information, please call the museum at (413)-584-4699 or visit us online at pphmuseum.org.

On July 7th, “A Perfect Spot of Tea” will feature musical guest Peter West. He has been playing guitar professionally since 1980 and takes his audiences on a melodious and stimulating turn through instrumental jazz, pop, and original songs. He has been giving wonderful performances at the tea series for over two decades.

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A Perfect Spot of Tea” is held Saturdays from July 7th through August 18th,  2018. It will continue on July 14th with musical guest 56 String Duo, an Indian-inspired sitar and 12-string guitar duet. The series is made possible through generous donations from area restaurants, businesses, musicians, and volunteers who provide the tea, pastries, flowers, music, and service for this program.

The program is inspired by the traditional teas held by the Porter-Phelps-Huntington family to bring together members of the community. Elizabeth Porter Phelps, a resident of the house from its construction in 1752 until her death in 1817, noted the teas often attracted ten to fifteen couples weekly. Visitors would “tarry” a while over a beverage that “cheers but not inebriates.” Elizabeth’s daughter even met her future husband, Dan Huntington, at one of these events. The museum invites you to come to “A Perfect Spot of Tea” and engage with communities past and present!

Wednesday Folk Traditions with Reggae, Rock, and African Drumming with SayReal

JUNE 27, 2018

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 HADLEY—Wednesday Folk Traditions at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum continues on June 27th, 2018 with SayReal, a group of young musical revolutionaries who fuse reggae, rock, and traditional African drumming, featuring Northampton natives and siblings Naia Kete and Imani Elijah, and Lee John. This performance and all Wednesday Folk Traditions concerts are held Wednesday evenings at 6:30 pm in the Sunken Garden at the Porter‑Phelps‑Huntington Museum, 130 River Drive, Route 47, Hadley MA 01035.  Admission is $12, $2 for children 16 and under.  Picnickers are welcome on the museums grounds starting at 5:00 pm. The museum and its grounds are a smoke-free site. For further information please call (413) 584‑4699 or view www.pphmuseum.org .

SayReal embodies a strong musical lineage, formed by siblings and Northampton natives Naia Kete and Imani Elijah who are now joined by Lee John to help channel their raw energy and vision. All three cite music as a source of inspiration and healing throughout their entire lives. Imani and Naia began their musical career as children singing in “Children of the Most High” before moving on to master African drumming, guitars, keyboard, and vocals. Together, they weave together sounds that soothe, heal, and inspire love and unity. Most recently, they released the music video “Frederick’s Song (Freedom)” based on the life and teachings of abolitionist Frederick Douglass, inspired by their own experiences being biracial and the prejudices they have faced.

SayReal has established itself as a powerhouse group. Vocalist Naia Kete’s performance in the top ten of The Voice gathered acclaim and support from fans nationwide. Naia met musical partner Lee John when she was 17 while collaborating on the recording of her first EP. SayReal was born then, but didn’t become official until a few years ago when legendary producer Randy Jackson came to their show at a small venue in Los Angeles. He hailed them as a “super group” and from that point on they began performing under the name SayReal, releasing their first album.  While every member is a multi-instrumentalist, Imani and Lee focus on drums, Naia on bass, and all three provide vocals. Each member is also deeply guided by their musical families and upbringing. Naia and Imani grew up in the Valley’s reggae band Rebelle, while Lee John’s father, Earl Slick, is famous for playing lead guitar for legends such as David Bowie. The strong musical lineage in their families is the largest influence on their style and message. Overall, the group champions integrity and strives to be examples of sincerity and honor the truth within themselves.”

Wednesday Folk Traditions continues on July 11 with José Gonzalez and Criollo Clasico  performing contemporary rhythms of Puerto Rico, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic. Gonzalez, acclaimed for his original compositions featuring the cuatro, will be joined by sons Ahmed, a flute sensation, and multi-percussionist Rene—together,  this family forms one of the most prestigious music ensembles of Puerto Rico.

 

The Porter-Phelps Huntingon Museum’s Wednesday Folk Traditions is funded, in part, by grants from: the Marion I. And Otto C. Kohler Memorial Fund at the Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts; the Amherst and Hadley Cultural Councils, local agencies, supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency; Eversource Energy, Easthampton Savings Bank, Peoples Bank, and with generous support from many local businesses. 

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum is located at 130 River Drive (Route 47) in Hadley, two miles north of the junction of Routes 9 and 47. The Museum is open for guided tours Saturday through Wednesday from 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. The house, which remains unchanged since the family’s occupancy, tells the story of six generations of prominent Hadley residents. The family, prosperous traders turned farmers, fought in both the French and Indian and Revolutionary Wars, rose to prominence in local government, and embodied a consistently progressive social consciousness. Tours highlight both local and regional narratives, from architecture, material culture, and labor, to early-American theology, economics, women’s history and social movements. For further information about tours or other programs, please call the Museum at (413) 584-4699 or visit our website at http://www.pphmuseum.org.