COMMUNITY DAY FOR SOUTH HADLEY, AMHERST, AND SUNDERLAND ON JUNE 3

The Porter-Phelps- Huntington-Museum invites all residents of South Hadley, Amherst and Sunderland o a Community Day on Sunday, June 3 from 10:00am to 3:30pm. All residents are welcome to the Museum for free tours on the half hour. Afterwards, guests can relax on the back veranda with complimentary lemonade and cookies. Members of the community are encouraged to explore the homestead and grounds of one of the founding families of Hadley and learn about the history of the Connecticut River Valley.  

The Porter-Phelps- Huntington Museum provides a detailed look at the role of one family in the span of over 200 years of history in the Connecticut Valley. The home, built in 1752, is preserved to its circa 1800 structure and interior décor, and houses the family’s personal belongings accumulated over generations. During a tour of the house, visitors witness the impact of historical events like the Revolutionary War, the abolition of slavery, learn more about the changing role of women, and the influence of various theological movements on local society. As the house was passed from woman to woman, unusual in its time, the museum offers an oft-overlooked perspective on women’s social roles and history over the past few centuries. A visit to the Porter-Phelps- Huntington House is a unique experience that allows guests to explore the history of New England on a personal, intimate level through the eyes of one family.

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This summer, Mount Holyoke College senior, Miriam Barton, is a summer museum assistant at the P-P-H Museum and conducting tours. As an anthropology major, she is “interested in the experiences and surrounding cultures that impacted the family. This family was innovative and progressive in many aspects: social movements, architecture, land usage, and more.” As is tradition, each summer museum assistant writes their own tour based on their own specializations and interests. “Everyday I get to walk around the Porter Phelps Huntington House, where there is over 266 years of rich history surrounding me,” says Barton. She hopes to see many familiar faces from South Hadley at this Community Day.

Today, the house is not only host to historical interpretation, but also to weekly concerts and teas. Wednesday evenings from June 13th through July 25th, the Museum presents Wednesday Folk Traditions, an annual concert series featuring talented musicians working in a vast array of traditions, cultures, genres, and sounds, ranging from traditional American folk singers to diverse international ensembles. Every Saturday afternoon in July through August, the Museum hosts “A Perfect Spot of Tea,” where guests are invited to relax on the back porch, sample desserts and tea from local restaurants and bakeries, and listen to talented local musicians.  

In addition, “Massachusetts,” an exhibit by Philip Grant is on display in the Corn Barn. “Massachusetts” is a series of oil paintings on linen and canvas, completed with a unique combination of modern realist and traditional techniques. The scenes depicted of his neighbors and locations around his home of Hampden form a part of Grant’s accumulation of a visual autobiography through art.

COMMUNITY DAY FOR NORTHAMPTON AND HATFIELD ON JUNE 2

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The Porter-Phelps-Huntington-Museum invites all residents of Northampton and Hatfield to a Community Day on Saturday, June 2 from 10:00am to 3:30pm. All residents are welcome to the Museum for free tours on the half hour. Afterwards, guests can relax on the back veranda with complimentary lemonade and cookies. Members of the community are encouraged to explore the homestead and grounds of one of the founding families of Hadley and learn about the history of the Connecticut River Valley.  

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum provides a detailed look at the role of one family in the span of over 200 years of history in the Connecticut Valley. The home, built in 1752, is preserved to its circa 1800 structure and interior décor, and houses the family’s personal belongings accumulated over generations. During a tour of the house, visitors witness the impact of historical events like the Revolutionary War, the abolition of slavery, learn more about the changing role of women, and the influence of various theological movements on local society. As the house was passed from woman to woman, unusual in its time, the museum offers an oft-overlooked perspective on women’s social roles and history over the past few centuries. A visit to the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House is a unique experience that allows guests to explore the history of New England on a personal, intimate level through the eyes of one family.

This summer, Northampton native and Barnard College student Cara Hudson-Erdman will be working at the PPH Museum and leading tours.  As an art history major, Hudson-Erdman is fascinated by “the intricacies of the architecture and objects of the farmstead and how this family built, socialized and worked in their spaces.” As is tradition, each summer museum assistant writes their own tour based on their own specializations and interests. “I’m looking forward to giving tours this summer because I think the most special aspect of PPH is that it is a living museum-- its history continues with the interpretation of each successive museum assistant and the interactions that occur between visitors and the traces of those who lived here in the past,” says Hudson-Erdman. She hopes to see many familiar faces from Northampton at this Community Day.

Today, the house is not only host to historical interpretation, but also to weekly concerts and teas. Wednesday evenings from June 13th through July 25th, the Museum presents Wednesday Folk Traditions, an annual concert series featuring talented musicians working in a vast array of traditions, cultures, genres, and sounds, ranging from traditional American folk singers to diverse international ensembles. Every Saturday afternoon in July through August, the Museum hosts “A Perfect Spot of Tea,” where guests are invited to relax on the back porch, sample desserts and tea from local restaurants and bakeries, and listen to talented local musicians.  

In addition, “Massachusetts,” an exhibit by Philip Grant is on display in the Corn Barn. “Massachusetts” is a series of oil paintings on linen and canvas, completed with a unique combination of modern realist and traditional techniques. The scenes depicted of his neighbors and locations around his home of Hampden form a part of Grant’s accumulation of a visual autobiography through art.

"Massachusetts," an Exhibit by Philip Grant

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The Porter-Phelps Huntington Museum will present a solo exhibition of paintings by award-winning artist Philip Grant.  The exhibition of portraits and scenes collectively entitled “Massachusetts,” were inspired by Grant’s neighbors and his daily walks around his home in Hampden, MA. The exhibit will be on display from June 1st to July 24th at the museum’s historic Corn Barn. 

“Massachusetts” is a series of oil paintings on linen and canvas, completed with a unique combination of modern realist and traditional techniques. The scenes depicted of his neighbors and locations around his home of Hampden form a part of Grant’s accumulation of a visual autobiography through art. Grant drew inspiration from Andrew Wyeth and the Dutch Masters to create images that explore scenes of nature in Western Massachusetts. Recently, Grant completed “A Portrait of Afghanistan” upon reflection of his time in thePeace Corps, and the series debuted at the Porter-Phelps Huntington Museum in the summer of 2017. 

Before shifting focus to paint, Grant’s career was centered in product design and development, specializing in toys and games, and the influence of this field is seen in his artistic style.  As a winner of awards from the Monson Arts Council, the Piedmont show, and Agawam’s juried art show, Grant is established as a foremost oil painter in the Pioneer Valley. With exhibitions at Bing Arts Center in Springfield and the Public Library in Wilbraham under his belt, he is currently preparing a series of paintings of sthe wetlands of the Jersey Shore where he grew up. Beyond his travels in the Middle East and the natural landscape of his home, Grant cites his studies with famed abstract artist and Yale professor Josef Albers as a chief influence on his technique and style.

THE SIXTY-NINTH OPENING OF THE PORTER-PHELPS-HUNTINGTON MUSEUM

            The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museuman historic house museum dating to 1752 in Hadley, Massachusetts opens Saturday May 19, 2018 for its 69th season. Guided tours will be available Saturday through Wednesday from 1:00 to 4:30 pm. The museum is closed on Thursdays and Fridays. Admission is $5 for adults and $1 for children.

            The Porter-Phelps-Huntington House, known as Forty Acres, is an 18th-century farm on the banks of the Connecticut River that today interprets life in rural New England over three centuries.  Through the words, spaces and possessions of the women and men who lived here, the Museum portrays the activities of a prosperous and productive 18th-century farmstead. Members of this household along with numerous artisans, servants and slaves made Forty Acres an important social and commercial link in local, regional and national cultural and economic networks.  Through the 19th century the generations transformed the estate into a rural retreat. In the 20th-century the house was preserved as a museum by family members and now contains the possessions of six generations of this extended family.

            The rooms in the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum remain as they were arranged by members of the family to accommodate the procession of relatives, neighbors, community leaders and workers who crossed the house’s threshold.  From farmers and businessmen, to religious leaders and social workers, to servants and slaves, the stories of many men, women, and children spanning 250 years of American History are told  within the house. The Porter-Phelps-Huntington House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. 

             Programs this summer include the thirty-seventh season of WEDNESDAY FOLK TRADITIONS, featuring some of New England's finest ethnic folk music performers and ensembles. Performances will be held Wednesday evenings at 6:30 P.M starting June 13 with Grammy nominated Senagalese Master Kora player Youssoupha Sidibe who performs ancient African Harp styles blended with Sufi devotional chanting and western music to create a unique musical expression that he has shared around the world.  The WFT series continues with weekly performances through July 25. 

             "A PERFECT SPOT OF TEA" will be held each Saturday in July and August with seating at 2:30 P.M. and 3:30 P.M. on the museum's back veranda.  Local musicians will perform while guests sip tea and taste pastries donated by local restaurants.

             Special exhibits in the Corn Barn this summer will include a solo exhibition of paintings entitled Massachusetts by award winning artist Philip Grant.  Described as a visual autobiography, the portraits and scenes feature neighbors and places around Grant’s home in Hampden. Grant paints in oil on linen laminated panels or stretched canvas using traditional methods combined with modern realist techniques. This series of images reflect influences from Andrew Wyeth to the Dutch Masters.  The exhibition will be on view June 1 to July 24.

          The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum is also the designated Way-Point Center for the National Connecticut River Scenic Byway. The Museum hosts a panel exhibit on the natural history of the Valley, the Museum’s history, and sites along the by-way for travelers. A newly created trail system begins at the Museum, traverses the farm fields along the river and continues along the old buggy path to the top of Mount Warner where the family grazed their cattle in the 18th century.

Next Week: A Perfect Spot of Tea with A. Burris Jenkins

On Saturday, August 26 "A Perfect Spot of Tea" will continue featuring a performance by A. Burris Jenkins. Jenkins will premier some of his most recent compositions of famous classical pieces re-imagined in a jazz style.

Admission is $12 per person, and there are seatings at 2:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Reservations will not be taken in advance. Tours will be given for an additional fee every hour on the half hour; at 1:30, 2:30, and 3:30.

 

Next Week: A Perfect Spot of Tea continues with The West County Jazz Trio

On Saturday, August 19th "A Perfect Spot of Tea" will continue with a performance by The West County Jazz Trio. The group plays mostly mainstream jazz music including some originals and with an occasional foray into standards and jazz Latin tunes. The group includes Judith Williams who comes from Greenfield, plays keyboards and sings on occasion; Tony Rice, who focuses the beat with his drums, and lives in Conway; and Tom Ulrich who plays double bass and comes from Ashfield.  The trio has been together for five or six years as part of a quintet and other formats, and play here and there around Franklin County and beyond in a variety of settings and functions. 

Admission is $12 per person, and there are seatings at 2:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Reservations will not be taken in advance. Tours will be given for an additional fee every hour on the half hour; at 1:30, 2:30, and 3:30.

Next Week: A Perfect Spot of Tea featuring The Blackbird Effect

On August 12th, 2017 the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum's "A Perfect Spot of Tea" will continue featuring a performance by The Blackbird Effect. John Cabán and Pan Morgan play bent blues, greenjazz, in addition to other genres.  With deep roots in more than one America, The Blackbird Effect presents an exciting, improvisational blend of musical colors in more than one language. John Cabán plays steel guitar and atmosphere, and also sings. Pan Morigan brings vocals, banjo, hunter’s harp, viola, and various other instruments. Together they create new music and interpret the old, drawing on a deep wellspring of multi-roots: From Appalachian folk, blues, and jazz, to Scottish music, Irish balladry, and Puerto Rican rural song tradition.

Seatings are held at 2:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Admission is $12.

Next Week: A Perfect Spot of Tea featuring 56 String Duo

A centuries-old tradition of afternoon tea endures at Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum with “A Perfect Spot of Tea.” Since the house’s construction in 1752, Hadley residents and other passers-by have visited the farmstead for good conversations, a beautiful view, lively music, and a beverage that, as original resident Elizabeth Porter Phelps once wrote, “cheers but not inebriates.” We are pleased to welcome Robert Markey and Andrew Jenkins’ 56 String Duo, a hybrid of classical guitar and traditional hindustani ragas, to perform for “A Perfect Spot of Tea” on August 5th. Seatings are held at 2:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Admission is $12.

Next Week: A Perfect Spot of Tea featuring West & Jackson

On Saturday July 29th "A Perfect Spot of Tea" will continue with a performance by West and Jackson. The group takes audiences on a melodious and stimulating turn through their songbook of instrumental jazz, pop, and original songs. Peter West has been performing at "A Perfect Spot of Tea" for over a decade. At his side is Bert Jackson, another highly skilled guitarist, with over 25 years of playing experience in blues, jazz, and other styles.

Admission is $12 per person, and there are seatings at 2:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Reservations will not be taken in advance. Tours will be given for an additional fee every hour on the half hour; at 1:30, 2:30, and 3:30.

Next Week: Layaali Arabic Music Ensemble performs at Wednesday Folk Traditions series

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On Wednesday, July 26th, the Wednesday Folk Tradition concludes its 36th season with a performance by Layaali Arabic Music Ensemble. The group will entertain with traditional and popular music of the Arab world.

The concert will begin at 6:30pm. Picknickers are welcome on the grounds beginning at 5:00pm. Admission is $1 for adults and $2 for children and under.

SUNDAY, JULY 30TH: THE PORTER PHELPS HUNTINGTON MUSEUM PRESENTS A VERY SPECIAL PERFORMANCE BY THE SOUTH HADLEY MANDOLIN ORCHESTRA

HADLEY, MA—The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum will present a performance by the South Hadley Mandolin Orchestra on Sunday, July 30, 2017 at 2:00 pm. The program will feature Mozart’s Flute Quartet in D Major, J.S. Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto #3 in G Major, and the Summer suite, a series of trios by Phillip Tenta and Frenceso Barsanti. Admission to the concert is free, donations are greatly appreciated. For more information, click here.

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Next Week: Wednesday Folk Tradition featuring Zikina

On Wednesday, July 19th, Zikina will be performing at our Wednesday Folk Tradition series. Music lovers of all varieties will find something to enjoy in their performance. World music fans will be intrigued by rare instruments placed in a highly original context. Rock and funk fans will find some heavy head nodding grooves to soak in. Jazz lovers will appreciate the improvisational melodic interplay between Gideon Ampiere's instruments and Mike Cardozo's guitar.

The concert will begin at 6:30. Picnickers are welcomed on the grounds beginning at 5:00pm. Tickets are $12 for adults and $2 for children 16 and under.

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Next Week: Wednesday Folk Traditions continues with the Eighth Annual Horacace Clarence Boyer Memorial Gospel Performance featuring the Amherst Area Gospel Choir

On Wednesday, July 12th, the Eighth Annual Horace Clarence Boyer Memorial Gospel featuring the Amherst Area Gospel Choir will continue our 36th Season of the Wednesday Folk Traditions.

The performance will continue Horace Clarence Boyer's tradition of bringing gospel to all. The choir performs songs inspired by slave spirituals, the African Diaspora, Tommy Dorsey's Big Band hits, Boyer's original music, and contemporary pieces.

The concert will begin at 6:30pm. Picnickers are welcome on the ground beginning at 5:00pm. Admission is $12 for adults and $2 for children 16 & under.

Hadley Community Day, 4th Of July

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington-Museum invites all residents of Hadley to a Community Day on Tuesday, July 4, 2017 from 10:00am to 3:30pm. All residents are welcome to the Museum for free tours on the half hour. Afterwards, guests can relax on the back veranda with complimentary lemonade and cookies. Members of the community are encouraged to explore the homestead and grounds of one of the founding families of Hadley, and learn about the history of the Connecticut River Valley.

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum provides a detailed look at the role of one family in the span of over 200 years of history in the Connecticut Valley. The home, built in 1752, is preserved to its circa 1800 structure and interior décor. During a tour of the house, visitors witness the impact of historical events like the Revolutionary War, the abolition of slavery, learn more about the changing role of women, and the impact of various theological movements on local society. A visit to the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House allows guests to experience the evolution of a nation as seen through the eyes of one local family.

Today, the house is not only host to historical interpretation, but also to weekly concerts and teas. Wednesday evenings from June 7th through July 26th, the Museum presents Wednesday Folk Traditions, an annual concert series featuring talented musicians working in a vast array of traditions, cultures, genres, and sounds, ranging from traditional American folk singers to diverse international ensembles. Every Saturday afternoon in July through August, the Museum hosts “A Perfect Spot of Tea,” where guests are invited to relax on the back porch, sample desserts and tea from local restaurants and bakeries, and listen to talented local musicians.