This Week: ReBelle!

HADLEY, MA-- The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum is excited to announce the return of local roots reggae aficionados, ReBelle, to continue the 36th annual Wednesday Folk Traditions concert series. Intergenerational and intercultural, ReBelle performs inspirational and meditative original roots reggae in four languages.  Mythical chants mix with pulsing tribal rhythms, guitar, and tight harmonies. This and all other performances are held Wednesday evenings at 6:30 pm in the Sunken Garden at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum, 130 River Drive, Route 47, Hadley, MA 01035. General Admission is $12 and $2 for children 16 and under. Picnickers are welcome on the museum grounds beginning at 5:00 pm. The Museum and its grounds are a smoke-free site.

 

ReBelle is an intergenerational and intercultural roots reggae band from Africa and America, founded by Kalpana Devi and Emmanuel Manou. Their eloquent compositions of pulsing tribal rhythms and strong arrangements are a combination of Rasta, soul, folk, and poetic insurgence elements. Vocalists chant meditations on liberation atop a band propelling energy and soul with lyrics in English, Wolof, Creole, and French. The band’s mystical sound is internationally acclaimed with numerous performances in Senegal and Cape Verde. ReBelle and its members are committed to bringing love, justice, and unity among people and nations through their music. They  have received praise from the Valley Advocate, Relix, and the Woodstock Review. The Valley Advocate described ReBelle as having “heavy channeling in their live shows…When ReBelle performs, concert halls become churches, and for several hours, at least, people come together.”


Wednesday Folk Traditions continues on June 28th with a performance by Youssoupha Sidibe and Charles Neville and continues Wednesdays throughout July.  Youssoupha Sidibe, a renowned Senegalese musician and master Kora player, will be joined by saxophonist Charles Neville to present an eclectic mix of traditional West-African pieces and New Orleans Jazz.

 

Wednesday Folk Traditions is funded, in part, by grants from: the Marion I. And Otto C. Kohler Memorial Fund at the Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts; the Amherst and Hadley Cultural Councils, local agencies supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency; Eversource Energy, Easthampton Savings Bank, PeoplesBank, and Wal-Mart Foundation, and many additional local businesses.

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum Community Days

Community days welcome our neighbors to learn about this house and its relationship to Pioneer Valley history. 

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum provides a detailed look at the role of one family over the span of over 250 years of history in the Connecticut Valley. During a tour of the museum, visitors can witness the impact of historical events like the Revolutionary War, the abolition of slavery, learn more about the changing role of women, and the impact of various theological movements on local society. A visit to the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum allows guests to experience the evolution of a nation as seen through the eyes of one local family.  

On Community Days, free tours will be given every half hour from 10 am - 3:30 pm for the following communities this season:  

Ashfield, Conway, South Deerfield Community Day - Saturday, June 24, 2017

Amherst, Northampton and Pelham Community Day - Sunday, June 25, 2017

Hadley Community Day - Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Next Week: Viva Quetzal!

One week from today, June 14th, we will be presenting the next concert of the 2017 Wednesday Folk Traditions series. Viva Quetzal. The group plays a myriad of genres from World to Afro-Andean to Latin to Jazz Fusion.  We look forward to enjoying Viva Quetzal's Music with you next week!

Wednesday Folk Tradition: Thee Art of Steele

Excited to kick of the Wednesday Folk Tradition concert series in memory of Art Steele!

The concert begins at 6:30 pm in the Sunken Garden at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum, 130 River Drive, Route 47, Hadley, MA 01035. General admission is $12, or $2 for children 16 and under. Picnickers are also welcome on the museum grounds beginning at 5:00 pm.

Wednesday Folk Traditions: Rain or Shine!

"Thee Art of Steele," the first performance in our 2017 Wednesday Folk Traditions will take place rain or shine on Wednesday, June 7th. The concert will be moved to the North Hadley Congregation Church in the event of a rain-out.

 

Please check our Facebook, website news http://www.pphmuseum.org/news/ or call 413-584-4699 for updates.

A decision will be made by 2 PM Wednesday. Looking forward to seeing you to celebrate Art Steels life with the Blues!

“BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE IN THE WORLD,” PORTRAITS FROM MY TRAVELS

 

 

On Display in the Corn Barn! Come check out Robert Markey's "Beautiful People in the World," Portraits from my Travels. Here's a sneak preview  with some words from the artist.

 

 

"My work combines the visual and the conceptual. I want the visual statement to be profound, to be questioning and to be a source of inspiration and of beauty. Conceptually, my work often speaks about hope, about humor and about the human condition: what it is and what it could be." ~ Robert Markey

Museum Intern: Matthew Smith

Hello, my name is Matthew Smith and I am one of the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum Interns for the Summer.

I am a graduate of the University of Massachusetts Amherst’s History and English programs, specializing in archaeology and preservation. My undergraduate honors thesis was titled Tensions in National Identity: Early Roman and American Stories of Peoplehood, which discussed the development of national identity through socio-cultural stories and their effects. I am particularly interested in learning how stories can influence history through community leaders; particularly, in what the clergy members read and how that in turn affected their sermons and their audience.

In the past, I have interned at the University of Massachusetts Archaeological Services and at the Poggio Civitate Field School. During the academic year, I work at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in the Residential Life Student Services department. In the future, I hope to go to graduate school to study history and museum studies.

I look forward to giving tours, researching, and working at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum this summer.

Museum Intern: Dalton Alves

Hi there, I’m Dalton Alves and I am serving as one of the 2017 Summer Museum Assistants here at the PPH.

I am a recent graduate of the University of Massachusetts Amherst’s history program. Much of my studies pertained to museum studies and American history/culture. I am especially interested in how the public interacts with historical sites. I believe it is beneficial for sites to encourage their visitors to think in a similar manner as a trained historian would—through the interpretation of primary and secondary sources. Doing so allows visitors to come away with deeper and more personal understandings of the past. I hope to provide visitors with such opportunities here at the PPH.

In the past, I have had the opportunity to work at historical organizations throughout the Pioneer Valley. Working here at PPH will provide me with an opportunity to utilize my pasts experience in the day-to-day running of the Museum. In addition, my experiences here at PPH will be invaluable as I enter the field of public history.

Hope you stop in soon!

Museum Intern: C.J. Weston

My name is CJ. I’ve just relocated to the Pioneer Valley from Philadelphia, and am excited to introduce myself as an intern here at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum for the 2017 Season! I am transferring to UMASS Amherst from Drexel University, where I’d spent the last three years studying Environmental Conservation, Politics, and Law. Working at PPH provides me a very special opportunity to gain hands-on access to information about the history of agricultural practices and economies in the united states, as well as the shifting socioeconomic landscapes that influence those practices. This kind of knowledge helps propel me towards long-term goals in the green nonprofit sector, where I hope to one day start an organization to coordinate sustainable agricultural businesses throughout the United States.

Wednesday Folk Traditions 2017 Listing

This year is the 36th season of the Wednesday Folk Traditions . As always performances are held Wednesday evenings at 6:30 pm. in the Sunken Garden at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum. Admission is $12, $2 children 16 and under. Picnickers are welcome on the museum grounds starting at 5:00 pm.

 

June 7  

“The Art of Steele:” A Blues Tribute in Memory of Art Steele, sound engineer and backbone to the WFT series for over thirty years, featuring powerhouse vocalist Evelyn Harris with Billy Arnold, John Mason and Dave Piccchi.

June 14

Viva Quetzal plays an astonishing array of exotic and familiar instruments and folkloric themes that create a link between the rain forests of Central and South America, the carnivals of Brazil, the high plateaus of the Andes, and the urban barrios of Latin America and the United States. 

June 21   

Rebelle, intergenerational and intercultural, perform inspirational and meditative original Roots reggae in four languages: Wolof, Creole, French and English. Mystical chants mix with pulsing tribal rhythms, guitar and tight harmonies.

June 28  

Youssoupha Sidibe and Charles Neville - legendary Grammy winning saxophone virtuoso known as “The Horn Man” joins the Grammy nominated Senegalese Master Kora player combining New Orleans with Reggae and ancient African Harp styles. 

July 12  

The Amherst Area Gospel Choir who continue Boyer’s tradition of bringing gospel to all with a compilation of songs deriving from slave spirituals, African Diaspora, Tommy Dorsey’s Big Band hits, Boyer’s original music, and contemporary pieces. Our 36th annual Gospel performance.

July 19

Zikina, featuring Uganda native Gideon Ampeire, plays an exciting fusion of Ugandan folk music with contemporary influences. Ampeire draws you in with traditional East African instruments including enanga, adungu, and kalimba - all of which he builds himself. The group weave a sonic landscape that flows seamlessly from intense grooves to joyous dance beats to dreamy textures. Gideon's vocals can cut powerfully through the fabric or float lightly above.

July 26

Layaali Arabic Music Ensemble perform traditional music of the Arab world preserving the rich legacy of Arabic culture through soulful vocals, haunting rhythms, hypnotic instrumental improvisations, and electrifying percussion. 

"BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE IN THE WORLD": PORTRAITS FROM MY TRAVELS by ROBERT MARKEY

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum is delighted to announce an exhibition of paintings by Robert Markey, whose eclectic sounds have had a recurring presence at the museum. “Beautiful People in the World,” Portraits from my Travels is a diverse collection by Markey created in oil on canvas which catalogue the many faces he has encountered in his travels in his work with kids and communities in Brazil, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Greece, Israel and India. The exhibit will run from May 15th through June 30th in the Museum’s Corn Barn.

Markey’s art style is unique and captivating, adding depth to the already rich story told by this prolific traveler. “My work combines the visual and the conceptual. I want the visual statement to be profound, to be questioning and to be a source of inspiration and of beauty. Conceptually, my work often speaks about hope, about humor and about the human condition: what it is and what it could be.”

Markey is currently working primarily in oil painting, sculpture and mosaic murals. In his paintings he works with layers of intense color creating a deep almost primeval feeling space. His sculptures are outdoor installations using steel, stone, glass, wood and mosaic. The sculptures often have a political or social motif. The murals are often done in collaboration with community organizations, most recently in Greece with refugees from Syria, Afghanistan and Iran, and in India with kids from the slums. Before that he has worked with street kids in Cambodia, orphans and handicapped boys in Sri Lanka, and kids in difficult situations in Brazil.

Markey received his B.S. in Physics from M.I.T. in 1969 and his M.S. in Computer Science from the University of Massachusetts in 1982. Until 1980 his main focus was music, performing on classical guitar and sitar. In 1981 he began to work in the visual arts, and has made this the center of his life for the past thirty-five years. He has traveled extensively, working, studying, and teaching in Japan, India, Cambodia, Sri Lanka, Europe, Central and South America. Markey presently works out of his studio in Ashfield, Massachusetts and teaches at the Springfield Museum School.

Markey will also be performing on August 5th, 2017 in the Museum’s “A Perfect Spot of Tea” series. Markey will perform sitar alongside Andrew Jenkins as part of “56 String Duo” They provide a diverse blend of Markey’s internationally-inspired Hindustani ragas with Jenkins’ 38-year-strong twelve-string guitar playing.

The Sixty-Eighth Opening of the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum, an historic house museum dating to 1752 in Hadley Massachusetts opens Sunday, May 14 for its 68th season. Guided tours will be available Saturday through Wednesday from 1:00 to 4:30 pm. The museum is closed on Thursdays and Fridays. Admission is $5 for adults and $1 for children.

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington House, known as Forty Acres, is an 18th-century farm on the banks of the Connecticut River that today interprets life in rural New England over three centuries. Through the words, spaces and possessions of the women and men who lived here, the Museum portrays the activities of a prosperous and productive 18th-century farmstead. Members of this household along with numerous artisans, servants and slaves made "Forty Acres" an important social and commercial link in local, regional and national cultural and economic networks. Through the 19th century the generations transformed the estate into a rural retreat. In the 20th-century the house was preserved as a museum by family members and now contains the possessions of six generations of this extended family.

The rooms in the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum remain as they were arranged by members of the family to accommodate the procession of relatives, neighbors, community leaders and workers who crossed the house’s threshold. From farmers and businessmen, to religious leaders and social workers, to servants and slaves, the stories of many men, women, and children spanning 250 years of American History are told within the house. The Porter-Phelps-Huntington House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Programs this summer include the thirty-sixth season of WEDNESDAY FOLK TRADITIONS featuring some of New England's finest ethnic folk music ensembles. Performances will be held Wednesday evenings at 6:30 P.M starting June 7 with “The Art of Steele:” A Blues Tribute in Memory of Art Steele, sound engineer and backbone to the WFT series for over thirty years, featuring powerhouse vocalist Evelyn Harris with Billy Arnold, John Mason and Dave Picchi. The seven week series continues with weekly performances through July 26.

"A PERFECT SPOT OF TEA" will be held each Saturday in July and August with seating at 2:30 P.M. and 3:30 P.M. on the museum's back veranda. Local musicians will perform while guests sip tea and taste pastries donated by local restaurants.

Special exhibits in the Corn Barn this summer will include “Robert Markey: Beautiful People in the World, portraits from my travels.” His work includes paintings from his work with kids and communities in Brazil, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Greece, Israel and India and will be on display May 15- June 30. "From July 1st to the 30th, we will feature “Phil Grant: A PORTRAIT OF AFGHANISTAN.”

Connecticut River Byway Waypoint Center Opening

Join us on September 7th from 1 to 4pm to celebrate the opening of a new Connecticut River Byway Waypoint Center at PPH! Visitors will view a new exhibit which shows key features of the National Connecticut River Byway. Visitors will also receive free refreshments, maps of the bicycling route along the byway, a guide to farmstands along the byway, and a brochure describing all seven scenic byways in western Massachusetts. Please come help us celebrate this exciting new feature to PPH!

"A Perfect Spot of Tea" with The Pioneer Valley Symphony Chamber Choir

A centuries-old tradition of afternoon tea endures at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum with “A Perfect Spot of Tea” summer series continues Saturday, August 27th with musical guests Pioneer Valley Symphony Chamber Choir

The Museum is excited to welcome the Pioneer Valley Symphony Chamber Choir, a vocal ensemble auditioned from the Pioneer Valley Symphony Chorus. Under the direction of Jonathan Harvey, the PVS Chamber Choir performs a cappella music of all styles, periods, and genres separate from the Symphony and throughout the Connecticut River Valley. Their repertoire consists of spirituals, madrigals, partsongs, motets, and other unaccompanied vocal music all the way from the 15th to the 21st century. The group recently celebrated 75 years of performance. 

“A Perfect Spot of Tea” also features delicious pastries donated by local businesses, attentive service, and, of course, plenty of Earl Grey tea. For an additional fee, guests may also tour the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House Museum.

"A Perfect Spot of Tea" with The West County Jazz Trio

A centuries-old tradition of afternoon tea endures at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum with “A Perfect Spot of Tea” summer series continues Saturday, August 20th with musical guests The West County Jazz Trio.

The West County Jazz Trio plays mostly mainstream jazz music including some originals and with an occasional foray into standards and jazz Latin tunes. The group includes Judith Williams who comes from Greenfield, plays keyboards and sings on occasion; Tony Rice, who focuses the beat with his drums, and lives in Conway; and Tom Ulrich who plays double bass and comes from Ashfield.  The trio has been together for five or six years as part of a quintet and other formats, and play here and there around Franklin County and beyond in a variety of settings and functions.

“A Perfect Spot of Tea” also features delicious pastries donated by local businesses, attentive service, and, of course, plenty of Earl Grey tea. For an additional fee, guests may also tour the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House Museum.

THE PORTER-PHELPS-HUNTINGTON MUSEUM PRESENTS: -“A LIFE IN LETTERS: ELIZABETH PORTER HUNTINGTON FISHER” by KRISTIN MALIN A MIXED MEDIA VISUAL ART INSTALLATION

The Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum in Hadley will host “A Life in Letters: Elizabeth Porter Huntington Fisher,” a mixed media installation by Kristin Malin. This exhibition will be housed in the Museum’s Corn Barn from August through October.

Seven years ago, a leather bound volume of letters, with dates from 1813 to 1855, was found in a packing box. The letters were from Elizabeth Porter Huntington Fisher to her mother, Elizabeth Whiting Phelps Huntington. The letters serve as a poignant, sweet and detailed glimpse into their lives, amidst the social fabric of the time. Elizabeth Whiting Phelps Huntington began collecting her daughter’s letters from her daughter’s first visit away from home, a tradition that continued throughout their lives.  This abiding practice, nurtured and passed along by the women in the Huntington family, is as relevant today, as it will transcend for generations to come.

Kristin Malin and Elizabeth Hunting Wheeler, a descendent of Elizabeth Porter Huntington, spent five summers transcribing the collection letters.  Elizabeth typed into her computer while Kristin deciphered the old fashioned cursive writing in ink on the delicate pages. For A Life In Letters” Malin transcribed onto long scrolls of paper in ink sections of the letters to impart a sense of Elizabeth Porter Huntington Sessions and what her life was like in the mid-1800’s. The letters, and Kristin’s scrolls, broach many topics including courtship, marriage, family, illness, death, God, religion, travel, education, and love.

Malin, whose husband and daughters are also decedents of the family, created a physical link between herself and Elizabeth Porter Huntington Fisher by transcribing her letters. In addition to the scrolls, the exhibit also includes portraits of Elizabeth Porter Huntington Fisher’s descendants, Olivia Birdsall, Katherine Birdsall, and Elizabeth Wheeler.

After receiving a BFA in painting from Louisiana State University, Malin attended the New York Studio School and received an MFA in painting from Columbia University. She participated in an artist residency on Governors Island in New York City and at the Catskill Center for Conservation and Development. Malin recently successfully raised funds to print a reproduction of a painting from her residency on Governors Island, a 19 panel folding panorama of New York from Governors Island, which is in the library at Printed Matter in New York. Last year, she co-organized The Piano Roll Project: Shared Sensibilities at Museum LA in Lewiston, Me, in which thirty artists altered player piano rolls.  Malin is currently represented by Caldbeck Gallery in Rockland, Maine.

"A Perfect Spot of Tea" with Bella Voce

A centuries-old tradition of afternoon tea endures at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum with “A Perfect Spot of Tea” summer series continues Saturday, August 13th with musical guests Bella Voce

Bella Voce features Lisa Woods as Mezzo-Soprano and Teri LaFleur as Soprano with Jerry Noble as the accompanying pianist. Both Woods and LaFleur are accomplished musical performers in the Pioneer Valley, while Noble is a distinguished composer, commissioned by various choral groups in the area. Together, the group performs a wide variety of pieces—from Opera to Broadway.

“A Perfect Spot of Tea” also features delicious pastries donated by local businesses, attentive service, and, of course, plenty of Earl Grey tea. For an additional fee, guests may also tour the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House Museum.

"A Perfect Spot of Tea" with West & Jackson

A centuries-old tradition of afternoon tea endures at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum with “A Perfect Spot of Tea” summer series continues Saturday, August 6th with musical guests West & Jackson

West & Jackson will return to the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum with another wonderful performance of instrumental jazz, pop, and original songs. Peter West has been performing at “A Perfect Spot of Tea” for over a decade, and has been playing guitar professionally since 1980. At his side is Bert Jackson, another highly skilled guitarist with over 25 years of playing experience in blues, jazz, and other styles.

“A Perfect Spot of Tea” also features delicious pastries donated by local businesses, attentive service, and, of course, plenty of Earl Grey tea. For an additional fee, guests may also tour the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House Museum.

"A Perfect Spot of Tea" with Show of Cards

A centuries-old tradition of afternoon tea endures at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum with “A Perfect Spot of Tea” summer series continues Saturday, July 30th with musical guests Show of Cards

The group Show of Cards was originally formed as an alternative folk-rock trio of siblings Karen, Joe, and Mike Cardozo. Currently singer-songwriter Karen, lead guitarist Mike, bassist Garrett Sawyer (of the Gaslight Tinkers), and drummer Joe Fitzpatrick (of Trailer Park) perform throughout Western Massachusetts, promoting their newest release, Something Better (2013).  This year Karen, Mike, and Joe will perform an acoustic show on the veranda.

“A Perfect Spot of Tea” also features delicious pastries donated by local businesses, attentive service, and, of course, plenty of Earl Grey tea. For an additional fee, guests may also tour the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House Museum.

"A Perfect Spot of Tea" with Same Old Blues: Dennis Shapson, Alan Kurtz, and Phil Craft

A centuries-old tradition of afternoon tea endures at the Porter-Phelps-Huntington Museum with “A Perfect Spot of Tea” summer series continues Saturday, July 23rd with musical guests Same Old Blues: Dennis Shapson, Alan Kurtz, and Phil Craft

Guitarist Dennis Shapson, Alan Kurtz on washboard and bones, and Phil Craft on harmonica perform ragtime country blues. Their repertoire consists of 1920’s and 30’s Piedmont and East Coast blues, and features reinterpretations of compositions by Blind Blake, Blind Boy Fuller, Mississippi John Hurt, and Mance Lipscomb.

“A Perfect Spot of Tea” also features delicious pastries donated by local businesses, attentive service, and, of course, plenty of Earl Grey tea. For an additional fee, guests may also tour the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House Museum.